Review: Good Me, Bad Me – Ali Land

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SYNOPSIS: How far does the apple really fall from the tree?

Milly’s mother is a serial killer. Though Milly loves her mother, the only way to make her stop is to turn her in to the police. Milly is given a fresh start: a new identity, a home with an affluent foster family, and a spot at an exclusive private school.

But Milly has secrets, and life at her new home becomes complicated. As her mother’s trial looms, with Milly as the star witness, Milly starts to wonder how much of her is nature, how much of her is nurture, and whether she is doomed to turn out like her mother after all.

When tensions rise and Milly feels trapped by her shiny new life, she has to decide: Will she be good? Or is she bad? She is, after all, her mother’s daughter. – via Goodreads

Well, I remember seeing this book and thinking it looked like it was a decent read, and then just never getting to it. It happens, don’t even judge me! Then I stumbled across it the other day quite a while back now on an Amazon deal and figured I might as well give it a shot, it looked interesting and like something I might like, what with my affinity to the darker elements of books.

Good Me, Bad Me is a decent read. The content is something that you are drawn to reading about, something that is dark and messed up, something that makes you want to see the larger picture to understand the extent of just how despicable Milly Annie’s story is, because that is human nature. You go for all of this and instead you get a relatively generic read.

The sentences are staccato and short, making it frustrating to read. Yes, I understand why this was written the way it was, but that doesn’t make it any better. It is also extremely difficult to pick apart when Annie is thinking something or when she is remembering something or if something is happening right now and it is her interpretation of the current issues. But still, all that being said and done, it doesn’t save this.

The story is winding and rather interesting, even while it is annoying and not enough answers are ultimately provided, though there is a lot of hinting. I saw a lot of rave reviews for this book, so I thought it would be better. Good Me, Bad Me is not a bad read, but it won’t linger with you long after, and it is rather forgettable.

Review: The Dead Zone – Stephen King

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SYNOPSIS: Johnny, the small boy who skated at breakneck speed into an accident that for one horrifying moment plunged him into The Dead Zone.

Johnny Smith, the small-town schoolteacher who spun the wheel of fortune and won a four-and-a-half-year trip into The Dead Zone.

John Smith, who awakened from an interminable coma with an accursed power—the power to see the future and the terrible fate awaiting mankind in The Dead Zone. – via Goodreads

I recently read It, after being in the mood for a King novel for ages. I thoroughly enjoyed it and read a few other books, but the King bug bit me again, and this time I ventured for The Dead Zone. Totally worth it folks, totally worth it.

The book is actually a rather quick read, and flows really well. The story is quite good, and draws you in from the beginning, though it does feel (especially when you get to the end) that you got a slightly more in depth snapshot of something that happened (like a moment in time), but served no real purpose, though you can also sit and think on that and see how it actually does mean something. This totally depends on what you take from the book, and everything will take something else.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading about Johnny and Sarah, his accident, his parents and how they (and Sarah) coped with Johnny’s coma after his accident. This is typical Stephen King, weaving some in depth characters to look at and chew on, and this book is no exception. Vera is a woman that starts off sounding like a woman with a bit of a stick up her ass, and then completely devolves into denial and some major mental health issues. Herb is a lovely man, and while he has some dark thoughts about Johnny, you can understand them, too.

The Dead Zone is proper psychological thrills. There are only few instances where there is some extreme violence and/or blood. The rest is all about Johnny and the “ability” he woke from the coma with. It is really interesting to read about Johnny’s recovery, and how this ability is something he fears, but is not something he can get rid of, and so it will haunt him. I thoroughly enjoyed reading about how the people around him treated him, how they didn’t believe him, thought he was crazy, feared him, respected him, or were creeped out. There were some really nice characters in here, too.

Overall The Dead Zone is a pretty good read that zips on by rather easily. I was engaged throughout, and once again can appreciate King’s craft, he is really talented. The book is well written and engaging and has a solid story to chew on, whether you feel ultimately that it made you ask questions, or just gave you a snippet of a few years in a young man’s life, it is worth checking out. Man, all I want is some more King to read now!